So you’re 17 years old, female, walking alone at night, you’re scared, and you’re being followed. You’ve got a phone but it’s almost out of charge.

Do you:

a) call police for help, or

b) make a post to Facebook about it


http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/i-need-help-hitandrun-victim-aprillee-gillens-facebook-plea-20140422-370w1.html

wilwheaton:

policymic:

Watch: CNN compares traditional Maori greeting to Chippendales and horny emus

How long does it take for the most trusted news source to turn a boring non-story into a racist, xenophobic nightmare?

About 13 seconds it turns out, and that’s only because CNN news correspondent Jeanne Moos takes her time narrating the intro.

Read more

The only thing surprising about this is that it wasn’t split-screened with the fucking plane.

emergentfutures:

Computers are providing solutions to math problems that we can’t check
Good news! A computer has solved the longstanding Erdős discrepancy problem! Trouble is, we have no idea what it’s talking about — because the solution, which is as long as all of Wikipedia’s pages combined, is far too voluminous for us puny humans to confirm.
A few years ago, the mathematician Steven Strogatz predicted that it wouldn’t be too much longer before computer-assisted solutions to math problems will be beyond human comprehension. Well, we’re pretty much there. In this case, it’s an answer produced by a computer that was hammering away at the Erdős discrepancy problem.
Full Story: Io9

emergentfutures:

Computers are providing solutions to math problems that we can’t check

Good news! A computer has solved the longstanding Erdős discrepancy problem! Trouble is, we have no idea what it’s talking about — because the solution, which is as long as all of Wikipedia’s pages combined, is far too voluminous for us puny humans to confirm.

A few years ago, the mathematician Steven Strogatz predicted that it wouldn’t be too much longer before computer-assisted solutions to math problems will be beyond human comprehension. Well, we’re pretty much there. In this case, it’s an answer produced by a computer that was hammering away at the Erdős discrepancy problem.

Full Story: Io9

Facebook is not a company of grass-roots tech enthusiasts. Facebook is not a game tech company. Facebook has a history of caring about building user numbers, and nothing but building user numbers. People have made games for Facebook platforms before, and while it worked great for a while, they were stuck in a very unfortunate position when Facebook eventually changed the platform to better fit the social experience they were trying to build.
 
Don’t get me wrong, VR is not bad for social. In fact, I think social could become one of the biggest applications of VR. Being able to sit in a virtual living room and see your friend’s avatar? Business meetings? Virtual cinemas where you feel like you’re actually watching the movie with your friend who is seven time zones away?
 
But I don’t want to work with social, I want to work with games.
 
Fortunately, the rise of Oculus coincided with competitors emerging. None of them are perfect, but competition is a very good thing. If this means there will be more competition, and VR keeps getting better, I am going to be a very happy boy. I definitely want to be a part of VR, but I will not work with Facebook. Their motives are too unclear and shifting, and they haven’t historically been a stable platform. There’s nothing about their history that makes me trust them, and that makes them seem creepy to me.
 
And I did not chip in ten grand to seed a first investment round to build value for a Facebook acquisition.

Notch, on the Facebook acquisition of Oculus. (via wilwheaton)

npr:

Photo: NASA
"Space Thief Or Hero? One Man’s Quest To Reawaken An Old Friend"
More than 30 years ago, Robert Farquhar stole a spacecraft. Now he’s trying to give it back.

npr:

Photo: NASA

"Space Thief Or Hero? One Man’s Quest To Reawaken An Old Friend"

More than 30 years ago, Robert Farquhar stole a spacecraft. Now he’s trying to give it back.

Once upon a time, 

The Coalition is Opposed to Mandatory Internet Filters

5th September 2013

The Coalition has never supported mandatory internet filtering. Indeed, we have a long record of opposing it.

Malcolm Turnbull, Liberal member of the House of Representatives and current Australian Minister for Communications

http://www.malcolmturnbull.com.au/media/the-coalition-is-opposed-to-mandatory-internet-filters

But then

Film studios outspend tech companies in political donations

3 February 2014

Village Roadshow, which was one of the main litigants in the iiNet copyright case, and a member of the lobby group pushing for the government to crack down on online copyright infringement, all but ceased donating to the Labor Party, donating just AU$22,000 to Labor, down from AU$115,850 in the previous 12 months. But spending to the Liberal Party increased significantly, jumping from AU$142,000 in the 2011-12 financial year to AU$315,004.

http://www.zdnet.com/film-studios-outspend-tech-companies-in-political-donations-7000025866/

And all of a sudden

George Brandis signals internet filter rebirth

February 15, 2014

"The government will be considering possible mechanisms to provide a legal incentive for an internet service provider to cooperate with copyright owners in preventing infringement on their systems and networks," Mr Brandis said.

He continued: “Another option that some stakeholders have raised with me is to provide the Federal Court with explicit powers to provide for third party injunctions against ISPs, which will ultimately require ISPs to take down websites hosting infringing content.”

http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/government-it/george-brandis-signals-internet-filter-rebirth-20140214-hvchm.html

And then

Attorney General’s new war on encrypted web services

March 17, 2014

Australia’s Attorney-General’s department wants new laws to force users and providers of encrypted internet communications services to decode any data intercepted by authorities.

The department argues the rise of over-the-top communications (OTT) makes it more difficult to guarantee that intercepted communications will be in an “intelligible” format. The rising adoption of encryption to thwart mass surveillance attempts is irking authorities.

http://www.itnews.com.au/News/375286,attorney-generals-new-war-on-encrypted-web-services.aspx

Wheeeeeeee